Sustainability Criteria

Sustainability has become a consistent concern of our stakeholders including Owners, Tenants, Staff and Customers it is not only necessary but ultimately in everyone’s best interest that our Construction Criteria incorporate the latest standards and requirements to achieve a quality indoor environment that is healthy, sustainable and economically efficient

Introduction

20 VIC Management Inc. (20 VIC) has made a commitment to becoming a sustainable corporate citizen. 20 VIC believes it is their obligation to continue to meet the needs of the present generation without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. The company is committed to promoting sustainable work environments and business practices, based on sound economics, environmental standards and social responsibility and to promoting safe, healthy and productive workplace for all employees, tenants and visitors

Purpose

The purpose of this manual is to provide the landlord's recommended fit-up standards for tenant premises to be utilized by tenants in the conduct and completion of tenant work in premises within the __________________ to minimize the environmental impacts and improve the safety, health, and productivity of the workplace.

1.0 Energy Performance within each CRU.

1.1 Scope

This standard applies to the energy efficiency of all mechanical and electrical systems installed in each tenant CRU.

1.2 Goals

For many years traditional building design has assumed an unlimited supply of inexpensive energy sources and has ignored both the upstream and downstream environmental impacts associated with unlimited energy use. Combustion of fossil fuels results in emissions linked to global warming. Reducing dependence on fossil fuels reduces environmental impacts both within the immediate community and beyond.

1.3 Performance Metric

The HVAC and lighting equipment must, at a minimum, meet the energy performance outlined in ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 or the local code, whichever is more stringent.

1.4 Procedures and Strategies

The systems impacted by the scope of the tenant fit-up are to provide a minimum energy performance. ASHRAE 90.1 provides criteria in the following categories:

  • Heating. Air-conditioning and ventilation (Section 6);
  • Service water heating (Section 7);
  • Power (Section 8);
  • Lighting (section 9);and,
  • Other equipment (Section 10).

Identify the key HVAC and lighting equipment to be installed within each CRU. Assess the components capacity, efficiency, and controls as per the corresponding section of ASHARE 90.1-2004 or local code.

Resource: www.ashrae.org

1.5 HVAC Air Balancing

1. Air balancing of the tenant ventilation systems and exhaust should be completed by a balancing contractor prior to occupancy. A copy of the final balancing is to be submitted to the Landlords Representative.

Resource: www.caabc.org

1.6 Equipment Efficiency

HVAC equipment is to be specified to meet or exceed the requirements of the American Society of Heating Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Engineers, ASHRAE, Energy Standard 90.1, 2004 by 20%.

Resources: www.ashrae.org

2.0 Refigerants in HVAC and Refrigeration Equipment

2.1 Scope

This standard applies to, air-conditioning, and refrigeration (HVAC&R) equipment operating within each tenant CRU.

2.2 Goals

The goal of this standard is to reduce damage to the ozone layer by reducing the use of ozone depleting substances in equipment.

2.3 Performance Metric

This standard requires that no CFC refrigerants be used by any HVAC & R equipment installed or used within the tenant space.

2.4 Procedures and Strategies

Refrigerants in new equipment are of minimal concern as CFC production in many developed countries was banned under the Montreal Protocol. Reusing equipment that originally contained CFC based refrigerant is permitted providing the refrigerant has been converted to a non-CFC refrigerant. Projects should consider replacing equipment instead of converting their refrigerants as new equipment will likely be significantly more energy efficient.

Specify non-ozone depleting refrigerants where applicable.

Resource: www.ec.gc.ca

3.0 Reduced Water Use Plumbing Fixtures

3.1 Scope

This standard applies to the specification of plumbing fixtures with low flush and flow rates to provide potable water savings and addressed all fixtures not supplied by base building.

3.2 Goals

The goal of this standard is to reduce unnecessary potable water use, thereby reducing infrastructure requirements and conserving natural resources. The water fixtures installed in the cru must be water conserving fixtures, collectively reducing water use by a minimum of 30% better than conventional fixtures.

3.3 Performance Metric

Plumbing fixtures will be specified to provide a quantifiable water savings over conventional plumbing fixtures as definedin Table 1.

Table 1: Conventional Water Flow/Flush Rates.

Fixture Flush/Flow Rate
Water Closets 6.0 litres/flush
Urinals 3.8 litres/flush
Showerheads 9.5 litres/minute
Faucets 8.3 litres/minute
Replacement Aerators 8.3 litres/minute
Metering Faucets 0.95 litres/cycle (15 second cycle)

Table 2: Sample Low Flow Fixtures

Fixture Flush/Flow Rate
Water Closets 4.8 litres/flush
Urinals 1.8 litres/flush
Showerheads 7.5 litres/minute
Faucets 5.7 litres/minute
Replacement Aerators 5.7 litres/minute
Metering Faucets 0.95 litres/cycle (15 second cycle)

3.4 Procedures and Strategies

This standard requires each fit-up design team to calculate standard projected water use within each CRU and to specific water fixtures which will provide a 30% reduction. It is not required that each fixture have a lower flush or flow rate than the conventional rates noted above, but the collective sum of the water use must meet the minimum reduction of 30%. The fewer the number of water fixtures in each CRU, the greater the impact fixtures will have on the water use. Specification of significantly lower flush/flow rates than the conventional rates will be more effective in meeting the goal when there are a greater number of uses of that particular fixture.

Resource: www.waterwiser.org, www.cwwa.ca, www.ec.gc.ca

WATER FIXTURES SPECIFICATION: The water fixtures installed in the cru must be water conserving fixtures, collectively reducing water use by a minimum of 30% better than conventional fixtures.

4.0 Tankless Water Heaters

4.1 Scope

This standard applies to the specification of domestic hot water heaters.

4.2 Goals

Combustion of fossil fuels results in emissions linked to global warming. Reducing dependence on fossil fuels reduces environmental impacts both within the immediate community and beyond.

4.3 Performance Metric

Hot water heaters will be specified to provide a quantifiable energy efficiency improvement over conventional hot water storage tanks.

TANKLESS HOT WATER HEATERS SPECIFICATION: 1. Tank-less Instant hot water systems. Electric or Gas shall be specified where applicable.

Resource: www.nrcan.gc.ca

5.0 Construction Waste Management

5.1 Scope

This standard applies during the construction phase of any tenant fit-up improvement project.

5.2 Goals

The goal of this standard is to divert construction, renovation and demolition (CRD) waste materials produced by fit-up projects from landfill space. CRD waste materials generate approximately 9.8 to 12.2 kg of solid waste per square meter of construction. Recycling of CRD waste reduces demand for virgin resources and extends the life of municipal landfill sites.

5.3 Performance Metric

A minimum diversion rate of 50% of all demolition, renovation, and construction waste produced by fit-up must be met. Diversion of construction waste can be measured by weight and/or by volume. Weigh bills, corresponding waste tracking forms, and receipts are to be used to provide proof of waste management strategies.

5.4 Procedures and Strategies

Waste will be generated during both the demolition phase and the construction phase of a project. There are currently many markets for the diversion of waste materials produced in both phases. The following strategies can be used during the planning phase of a project to help implement this standard.

Potential Diversion Methods: Waste materials may be diverted from landfill by:

Waste Haulers: generally recycle metal, but may also recycle wood, gypsum board, ceiling tiles, plastics, and glass. Contact waste haulers to determine which materials will be diverted and where the materials will be recycle

Scheduling: Limited bin storage space may influence diversion of source separated materials. Contractors should schedule pick-up with demolition activities to maximize diversion. Consider storing some demolition materials until cut-offs for new products are complete to maximize the diversion during fit-up.

CONSTRUCTION WASTE HANDLING SPECIFICATION: Construction waste shall be diverted from regular waste collection wherever possible. The minimum acceptable diversion rate is 50% of construction waste generated by the project.

Resource: www.gvrd.bc.ca , www.metrokc.gov , www.resourceventure.org

6.0 Indoor Air Quality Management, During Construction

6.1 Scope

This standard applies to indoor air quality management during all construction & demolition activities.

6.2 Goals

The goal of this policy is to ensure the indoor air quality is not compromised as to disrupt the comfort and well-being of contractors, sub trades, and surrounding occupants during fit-up projects.

6.3 Performance Metric

This standard requires Contractors develop and implement an indoor air quality management plan that:

  • meets or exceeds the Design Approaches of the Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors National Association (SMACNA) IAQ Guideline for Occupied Building Under Construction, Chapter 3;
  • uses air filtration of minimum MERV value of 8 on return air grills (when air handlers are running);
  • replaces air filtration on return air grills post-construction, prior to occupancy; and,
  • Protects absorptive materials onsite during fit-up.


6.4 Procedures and Strategies

This standard requires planning and co-ordination to provide proper indoor air quality during construction activities. The following procedures may assist in achieving the goal of this policy:

  • The General Contractor should educate the sub-trades on the site’s indoor air quality management plan and procedures.
  • General Contractor should identify and order absorptive materials protection (if required), and MERV 8 filters for the project as soon as possible so the project start-up and occupancy date is not delayed.
  • General Contractor to perform regular site inspections to document photos that demonstrate IAQ plan is being followed throughout construction activities.

INDOOR AIR QUALITY MANAGEMENT, DURING CONSTRUCTION, SPECIFICATION: The contractor is required to provide a Construction Indoor Air Quality Management Plan prior to the start of any work at the site. The plan shall meet or exceed the requirements of the Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors National Association (SMACNA) IAQ Guideline for Occupied Buildings under Construction, 1995, Chapter 3.

Resource: www.smacna.org

7.0 Lighting Power

7.1 Scope

This standard applies to the power density of the lighting installed in each tenant CRU.

7.2 Goals

For fit-up projects the reduction of lighting power is the greatest energy conservation option available. The combined use of high efficiency luminaries, proper control systems and the effective use of daylighting can result in reduced energy use from lighting and air conditioning requirements, and improved occupant well-being. Replacing one incandescent lamp with a fluorescent lamp can result in reduced emissions of approximately 680 kg of carbon dioxide and 6.8 kg sulfur dioxide.

7.3 Performance Metric

Tenant’s designs must exceed the lighting power density energy allowances outlined in ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2010. Lighting power density can be determined by utilizing the space by space method;

7.4 Space-by-Space Method

  1. Determine the interior lighting power as outlined in ASHRAE 90.1-2010, Section 9.6. This methodology allows for more space types. (See ASHRAE 90.1 for a full explanation).
  2. Calculate the lighting power allowance, in watts, by multiplying the lighting power density by the gross illuminated floor area of the building space type. Total the individual space allowances.
  3. Use the following formula: Interior Lighting Allowance = Space Floor Area x Space Type Lighting Power Density

7.5 Procedures and Strategies

The most effective way of ensuring compliance with this standard is to understand the lighting power limits and requirements of each space/area before the fit-up design begins. This standard addresses all permanently installed general, task and furniture lighting systems.

LIGHTING SPECIFICATION

Retail lighting is to be designed to meet a lighting power density to 15 w/sq. m (1.4 w/ s.f.) per ASHRAE Energy Standard 90.1, 2010.  This excludes full height display windows, refrigerated case lights, food warming lights, plant growth and medical (e.g. Dentist) equipment lighting.

Separate switches are required for display lighting, accent lighting, case lighting, task lighting, non-visual lighting and demonstration lighting.

Occupancy sensors are required in all meeting, training, storage and supply rooms >50 sq. ft. < 1000 sq. ft., office spaces up to 250 sq. ft., washrooms, dresser locker and fitting rooms. Lights can be manual on and auto off. Max time delay off is 30 minutes. Spaces partitioned up to the ceiling are required to have one control device in that space.

Lights that do not have to be switched; Night and emergency lights allowed for safety and security, where auto shutoff would endanger occupants. Lights have to be programmed based on a time of day schedule to turn lights off. Tenants may use their security systems to do this. For multi-level tenants, it is required to have separate zones for each floor. Any time override cannot be for longer than 4 hours. Tenants shall provide the details of their light switching and LPD calculations on drawings submitted to the LL for approval.

Resource: www.ashrae.org

8.0 Daylight Responsive controls

8.1 Scope

This standard addresses the conservation of energy by using lighting controls in areas where usage and/or daylight exposure will vary in adjacent areas for all regularly occupied spaces of each tenant unit.

8.2 Goals

The use of daylight improves indoor environmental quality. In addition, daylight can supplement or eliminate the demand for artificial lighting.   The primary objective of daylight controls is to reduce the demand for energy use.

8.3 Performance Metric

Lighting design shall include daylight responsive controls within 4.5 meters (15 feet) of all windows.

8.4 Procedures and Strategies

The fit-up will consider the amount of daylighting that can offset artificial light depending on the window glazing, building orientation, function of the space, season, daily weather, and outdoor shading features. Adjustable, programmable/sensor controls will be utilized to meet the varying lighting needs throughout the space. Computer models may assist in determining the varying lux values needed for the sensor limits.

For interior areas where daylighting is not available to offset artificial lighting needs other lighting controls will be utilized. Occupancy sensors, dimmers, and timers are an efficient way of controlling non-regularly occupied spaces while following the goals of this policy.

LIGHTING CONTROLS SPECIFICATION: Tenant lighting designs should include efficient lighting control alternatives. IE: Occupancy sensors for back of house areas, time clock control of main store lighting and signage

Resource: www.newbuildings.org/lighting

9.0 Material Selection- Low-emitting Materials

9.1 Scope

This standard includes all adhesives, sealants, paints and coatings, carpet systems, composite wood and laminate products installed within tenant CRU’s. This standard is intended to maintain the design attributes which were incorporated into the base building to provide interior air with lower source emissions.

9.2 Goals

All adhesives, sealants, paints, coatings, carpet systems, composite wood adhesives, and laminate adhesives have the potential to off-gas harmful chemicals such as volatile organic compounds, formaldehyde, or others, which degrade the air quality, causing adverse effects to surrounding occupants.   Volatile organic compounds (VOC’s) are the most common of these emissions. VOC’s react with sunlight and nitrogen oxides to form ground level ozone, which may have a negative impact on human health, agricultural crops, forests and ecosystems.

9.3 Performance Metric

Specify products that have documented emission rates which are in compliance with the product specific rates defined in the guidelines listed below.

Product Type Guideline
Adhesive South Coast Air Quality Management District Rule #1168 and Green Seal Standard GS-36.
Sealant South Coast Air Quality Management District Rule #1168.
Paint & Coatings Green Seal Standard GS-11/Green Seal Standard GC-03/South Coast Air Quality Management District Rule #1113..
Carpet Carpet and Rug Institutes Green Label Plus.
Carpet Pad Carpet and Rug Institutes Green Label.
Composite Wood & Laminate Adhesives No added urea-formaldehyde.

9.4 Procedures and Strategies

9.4.1 Paints and Coatings: There are many top coats, primer paints and coatings on the market which have “zero” or very low volatile organic compound concentrations.   Most paint manufacturers have a specific line designed to comply with Green Seal Standard GS-11. Anti-corrosive paints must comply with Green Seal Standard GC-03. Specialty paints must comply with South Coast Air Quality Management District Rule #1113. These product standards only apply to products that are applied in an uncured state on-site. Emissions rates are to be provided from the manufacturers before the product is installed on site.

9.4.2 Adhesives and Sealants: This standard applies to all adhesives or sealants that arrive on-site in an uncured state. All adhesives must, at minimum, meet the allowable limits of the South Coast Air Quality Rule #1168. Aerosol adhesives must Green Seal 036. Emissions rates are to be provided from the manufacturers before the product is installed on site.

9.4.3 Carpets and Carpet Pads: The Green Label and the Green Label Plus programs were developedby the Carpet and Rug Institute to address concerns associated with the negative impacts some carpets had on indoor air quality. Carpets that carry Green Label/Green label Plus certification are able to provide documentation of such at the time of specification.

LOW EMITTING MATERIALS SPECIFICATION: Paints and Coatings: designed to comply with Green Seal Standard GS-11. Anti-corrosive paints must comply with Green Seal Standard GC-03. Specialty paints must comply with South Coast Air Quality Management District Rule #1113. These product standards only apply to products that are applied in an uncured state on-site. Emissions rates are to be provided from the manufacturers before the product is installed on site.

Adhesives and Sealants: This standard applies to all adhesives or sealants that arrive on-site in an uncured state. All adhesives must, at minimum, meet the allowable limits of the South Coast Air Quality Rule #1168. Aerosol adhesives must Green Seal 036. Emissions rates are to be provided from the manufacturers before the product is installed on site.

Carpets and Carpet Pads: The Green Label and the Green Label Plus programs were developedby the Carpet and Rug Institute to address concerns associated with the negative impacts some carpets had on indoor air quality. Carpets that carry Green Label/Green label Plus certification are able to provide documentation of such at the time of specification.

Resources: www.aqmd.gov/rules/reg/reg11/r1168, www.environmentalchoice.com, www.carpet-rug.org

South Coast Rule 1168 VOC Limits

Product Type VAC Limit g/L
Contact adhesive 80
Carpet Adhesive 50
Carpet Pad Adhesives 50
Wood Floor Adhesives 100
Sub Floor adhesives 50
Ceramic Tile Install 65
VCT tile adhesives 50
Cove Base adhesives 50
Construction adhesives 70

South Coast Rule 1113 VOC Limits

Coating VAC Limit g/L
Varnish 350
Sanding Sealers 350
Lacquer 350
Graphic Coatings 500
Alkyds 420
Silicones 420
Quick dry enamel 400
Stains 350

Green Seal GS-11 Limits for Interior Paint

Paint Type VAC Limit g/L
Non-Flat 150
Flat 50

Other Considerations: The Recycle content section and regional materials are to be considered an item that we would like tenant designers and architects to consider as opposed to a mandatory requirement.

10.0 Material Selection-Recycled Content

10.1 Scope

The following standard applies to the specification of materials for the fit-up of tenant suites. 

10.2 Goals

The goal of this standard is to reduce environmental impacts through the specification of materials that incorporate recycled content. Using products with recycled content will support waste diversion efforts and reduce extraction of virgin materials.

The tenant space should choose materials with a high recycled content when available. Overall, the tenant should reach a total minimum recycled content of 10% for fit-up materials.

10.3 Performance Metric

Use materials, including furniture and furnishings, to incorporate recycled content (both pre-consumer and post-consumer) such that the recycled content equals at least 10% of the project material costs. Mechanical and electrical equipment are excluded from the calculations.

Recycled content will be defined in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission, Guidelines for the Use of Environmental Marketing Claims.

10.4 Procedures and Strategies

Recycled content is found in many furnishing and interior finish products. Manufacturers may have specific product lines designed to incorporate high amounts of recycled content. To reach the overall 10% recycled content goal, not all products have to include recycled content. As detailed in the Performance Metric section of this policy, the recycled content of the project is based on recycled content value of specific products and the cost of these products. Therefore large cost items will have a larger impact on the projects overall recycled content value.

Resource: www.ftc.gov/bcp/grnrule/guides980427 , www.csa.ca, www.buildinggreen.com/menus/

11.0 Material Selection- Regional Materials

11.1 Scope

The following standard applies to the specification of materials for the fit-up of tenant suites. 

11.2 Goals

The goal of this policy is to reduce environmental impacts associated with the transportation of materials and to support the regional economy 

11.3 Performance Metric

Materials should be specified to allow for 20% of the material value of the project to be manufactured within 800 km of the site or within 2,400 km if transported by rail to the city of installation. The point of manufacture will be determined to be the last point of assembly. Documentation of the last point of assemble will be provided by product manufacturers.

11.4 Procedures and Strategies

Regional material content is calculated by a percentage of the material value. Therefore large cost items will have a larger impact on the overall regional materials value. Focusing on materials of higher value is an efficient way to reach this standard. Some manufacturers may have multiple manufacturing locations, certain product lines are likely only manufactured at specific locations. Therefore it is important to determine where specified products are being manufactured.

Resource:  Regional Chamber of Commerce & Regional, Provincial Economic Development Agencies for building material manufacturers.

12.0 OTHER (appliances & equipment)

12.1 Scope

The following standard applies to computers, monitors, and televisions as well as refrigerators and appliances

12.2 Goals

Combustion of fossil fuels results in emissions linked to global warming. Reducing dependence on fossil fuels reduces environmental impacts both within the immediate community and beyond.

12.3 Performance Metric

Applicable appliances and equipment are to be certified under the Energy Star energy efficiency program.

12.4 Procedures and Strategies

Many computers, monitors, and televisions consume significant amounts of power even in an “off” state. The selection of Energy Star certified products ensures a minimum system efficiency and reduction of off-hour power consumption. Appliances certified by the Energy Star program are typically more energy efficient than non-certified products.

APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT SPECIFICATION: Appliances, computers, monitors and televisions are to be certified under the applicable Energy Star rating system.

Resource: www.energystar.gov